Prevent an asthma attack by avoiding these triggers

If you have asthma, you are not alone. In the United States, every 1 in 12 people suffers from asthma. Worldwide, there are an estimated 300 million people with asthma, according to the American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI). Those 300 million people around the globe know just how frightening and sudden an asthma attack can be.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, asthma attacks are caused by “triggers” that make it difficult for air to get into the lungs and thus restrict breathing. When this happens, an asthma attack is triggered.

Everybody is different and consequentially has different triggers. In order to best manage your symptoms, keep a journal noting the date and severity of an asthma attack, as well as possible triggers. Ask yourself, what kind of environment was I in? What was I exposed to? What could I have possibly inhaled? It is easier to answer the latter questions when you know both typical and less usual triggers. Continue reading to learn what triggers may be affecting you: